Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid (1950-2016) is famous for her extraordinary formal language using flowing, swung lines far exceeding existin designs. The skillfull interplay with the properties of the materials used is another characteristic of this world-famous architect's creations. Born in Bagdad, Hadid first studied mathematics in Beyrouth. She graduated as an architect at the famous AA, the Architectural Association School of Architecture, in London in 1977.

Zaha Hadid founded her own office in 1980, and shortly afterwards won several significant competitions. She was obviously ahead of her time with her bold designs, because it was only in 1993 that she could build the Fire Station for Vitra in Weil am Rhein. This project led to her breakthrough and was followed by many others all around the world. Among them, there is the phaeno in Wolfsburg, a ski-jump and a funicular in Innsbruck, a mobile pavilion for Chanel, the Sheikh Zayed Bridge in Abu Dhabi and numerous museums, like part of the Messner Mountain Museum. She created the very first museum planned by a woman in the United States, the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts in Cincinnati.

As in her architecture, Zaha Hadid's organic shapes are unmistakable in her extravagant furniture and light fixtures. Hadid designed the Genesy light charaterized by a tree's swinging lines for Artemide, the Avia suspension and the Aria light series for Slamp. Thanks to its flowing lines and radiance, it is a modern, nearly futurist new interpretation of the chandelier.

Photo: Steve Double